Fiscal year for memberships runs from January 1st thru December 31st.
Dues are $15.00 per person, $20.00 per couple and $25.00 for family. 
Name badges are required.



Contact Information:
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
President                           Ed Huskinson
Vice President                   John Paster
Secretary                            Lauri Bouley
Treasurer                           Bob Bouley
Sergeant-at-Arms             Gary Bolles
Past President​                  Gary Bolles

Directors Members at Large 
Tom Beilman                       2024
Daina Sandhop                   2023  
Aleta Huskinson                  2023




email me
Mohave County Gemstoners
PO Box 3992
Kingman, Az 86402
Webmaster: Lauri Bouley  greenhillfence@comcast.net




Club Committees

Field Trips - Member volunteers
Membership - Daina Sandhop  
Web Master-Lauri Bouley
Program -Board Member & Members
Refreshments- Lynne Smith
Silent Auction- Volunteers
Show Committee- Coordinataor:Daina Sandhop
Education AdHoc- Vacant

COMMITTEE CHAIRS ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND BOARD MEETINGS. CLUB PRESIDENT IS A MEMBER OF ALL COMMITTEES

ABOUT US

 The Mohave County Gemstoners (MCG) is a gem and mineral society located in Kingman, Arizona. It is a member of the Rocky Mountain Federation of Mineralogical Societies, which is a member of the American Federation of Mineralogical Societies. The MCG interests are related to geology and earth sciences.

Our Club is diverse in that we touch on all areas of rock hounding. We conduct Field Trips to explore Nature and find the stones and minerals that we can collect and take home to study or work with.

Many of our members go into the Lapidary Field; cutting, shaping and polishing to enhance the beauty of what we find. We do this by hand or by tumbling. The finished rock is then made into jewelry, art objects, or yard art.

We have speakers at our meetings that touch on many things: collecting rocks, nature, safety issues in nature, camping, the art of jewelry making, Turquoise, etc. 

Recreational Mining is the act of working a location or claim for lapidary, minerals or precious metals (gold and/or silver). MCG has an active claim for honey onyx. Other members also have claims. Mining techniques, history and artifacts are other interests.
  As one can see, the MCG is a highly diversified group for those interested in the earth sciences and geology.


Rockhounding 101

Survival:
1st Aid Kit-Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. Cactus, sharp rocks, stinging or biting bugs are constant.
Spare Tire-Always have a regular spare tire, aired up, and the tools to change it.
Full Tank-Always start the Field Trip with a full tank of gas. Most of our day trips will leave some in the case of emergencies.
Food & Water-Always have water, at least a gal. Bring something to eat or snack on, you know your needs better than anyone.
Know your Heat Tolerance-Know your limits, do not go by someone else's abilities or limitations in the heat.
4WD- Always assume you will need 4WD and good clearance. Most of the places we go are off road, through sandy washes and up rocky inclines. Dealerships do not always outfit your 4WD vehicle with good off-road tires, check that your tires can bear the weight of a loaded vehicle over pointy rocks.​ We can never garrentee that the road-unless paved- will be passable, even with 4WD. The roads are subject to change everytime it rains. 
NOTIFY TRIP LEADER if you are going to leave the group. Do not leave this to others. The trip leader is responsible for everyone on the outing.
Tools for Collecting:
Rock hammer, Chisel, small Shovel, Saftey GogglesA hammer is paramount. A regular hammer will work, but, the preferred tool is a rock hammer with a striking face on one side and a pick on the other. Estwing is a tried and true brand. A chisel is important, and in a pinch, a sturdy screwdriver will do the job. A small shovel is not necessary, but can come in handy. Depending on how much effort you want to exert a full size shovel is good, a regular pick is handy, and a good long pry bar, pointed on one end and flattened on the other, can really be useful. Safety goggles can save your eyes from the chips that fly off of the rock you are beating.
Bucket or Bag- A 5gl or 2gl bucket will work, a bag or an old backpack is easier to carry. Just know what you can handle and do not rely on others to pack your rocks back to your vehicle.
Spray Bottle-This is very handy to see what you just picked or dug up. It is also good for a quick cool down, clean your hands, etc.
Hat & Gloves-The hat can provide shade for your face and block the sun from your eyes as you search for rocks. A good pair of leather gloves will prevent small cuts and abrasions, cushion the blow of a hammer or chisel, and help eliminate blisters and splinters.
Fun Facts to Know and Tell:
Never lay your hammer (or anything else) down and walk away from it with the thought you will find it again. Painting part of it with a loud neon color will let people know it is yours when they come across it. 
Don't pile "your" rocks and walk away. On the rare chance you locate the spot again, your rocks may not be there. No one is going to take them on purpose, but things look different in nature to others. Someone will think they just "lucked" onto a great find. When your bucket or bag is full, go and empty it and then return to collecting.
A whistle can be a life saver. It can summon others or help locate a stray.
Always be at least 10 minutes early to departure time at Field Trips. If the stated time is 7, be there at 6:45. This is the time to sign in and any last minute changes or info is given at this time. Always know who the Trip Leader is.
Rockhounding 101

Survival:
1st Aid Kit-Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. Cactus, sharp rocks, stinging or biting bugs are constant.
Spare Tire-Always have a regular spare tire, aired up, and the tools to change it.
Full Tank-Always start the Field Trip with a full tank of gas. Most of our day trips will leave some in the case of emergencies.
Food & Water-Always have water, at least a gal. Bring something to eat or snack on, you know your needs better than anyone.
Know your Heat Tolerance-Know your limits, do not go by someone else's abilities or limitations in the heat.
4WD- Always assume you will need 4WD and good clearance. Most of the places we go are off road, through sandy washes and up rocky inclines. Dealerships do not always outfit your 4WD vehicle with good off-road tires, check that your tires can bear the weight of a loaded vehicle over pointy rocks.​ We can never garrentee that the road-unless paved- will be passable, even with 4WD. The roads are subject to change everytime it rains. 
NOTIFY TRIP LEADER if you are going to leave the group. Do not leave this to others. The trip leader is responsible for everyone on the outing.
Tools for Collecting:
Rock hammer, Chisel, small Shovel, Saftey GogglesA hammer is paramount. A regular hammer will work, but, the preferred tool is a rock hammer with a striking face on one side and a pick on the other. Estwing is a tried and true brand. A chisel is important, and in a pinch, a sturdy screwdriver will do the job. A small shovel is not necessary, but can come in handy. Depending on how much effort you want to exert a full size shovel is good, a regular pick is handy, and a good long pry bar, pointed on one end and flattened on the other, can really be useful. Safety goggles can save your eyes from the chips that fly off of the rock you are beating.
Bucket or Bag- A 5gl or 2gl bucket will work, a bag or an old backpack is easier to carry. Just know what you can handle and do not rely on others to pack your rocks back to your vehicle.
Spray Bottle-This is very handy to see what you just picked or dug up. It is also good for a quick cool down, clean your hands, etc.
Hat & Gloves-The hat can provide shade for your face and block the sun from your eyes as you search for rocks. A good pair of leather gloves will prevent small cuts and abrasions, cushion the blow of a hammer or chisel, and help eliminate blisters and splinters.
Fun Facts to Know and Tell:
Never lay your hammer (or anything else) down and walk away from it with the thought you will find it again. Painting part of it with a loud neon color will let people know it is yours when they come across it. 
Don't pile "your" rocks and walk away. On the rare chance you locate the spot again, your rocks may not be there. No one is going to take them on purpose, but things look different in nature to others. Someone will think they just "lucked" onto a great find. When your bucket or bag is full, go and empty it and then return to collecting.
A whistle can be a life saver. It can summon others or help locate a stray.
Always be at least 10 minutes early to departure time at Field Trips. If the stated time is 7, be there at 6:45. This is the time to sign in and any last minute changes or info is given at this time. Always know who the Trip Leader is.
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Rockhounding 101

Survival:
1st Aid Kit-Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. Cactus, sharp rocks, stinging or biting bugs are constant.
Spare Tire-Always have a regular spare tire, aired up, and the tools to change it.
Full Tank-Always start the Field Trip with a full tank of gas. Most of our day trips will leave some in the case of emergencies.
Food & Water-Always have water, at least a gal. Bring something to eat or snack on, you know your needs better than anyone.
Know your Heat Tolerance-Know your limits, do not go by someone else's abilities or limitations in the heat.
4WD- Always assume you will need 4WD and good clearance. Most of the places we go are off road, through sandy washes and up rocky inclines. Dealerships do not always outfit your 4WD vehicle with good off-road tires, check that your tires can bear the weight of a loaded vehicle over pointy rocks.​ We can never garrentee that the road-unless paved- will be passable, even with 4WD. The roads are subject to change everytime it rains. 
NOTIFY TRIP LEADER if you are going to leave the group. Do not leave this to others. The trip leader is responsible for everyone on the outing.
Tools for Collecting:
Rock hammer, Chisel, small Shovel, Saftey GogglesA hammer is paramount. A regular hammer will work, but, the preferred tool is a rock hammer with a striking face on one side and a pick on the other. Estwing is a tried and true brand. A chisel is important, and in a pinch, a sturdy screwdriver will do the job. A small shovel is not necessary, but can come in handy. Depending on how much effort you want to exert a full size shovel is good, a regular pick is handy, and a good long pry bar, pointed on one end and flattened on the other, can really be useful. Safety goggles can save your eyes from the chips that fly off of the rock you are beating.
Bucket or Bag- A 5gl or 2gl bucket will work, a bag or an old backpack is easier to carry. Just know what you can handle and do not rely on others to pack your rocks back to your vehicle.
Spray Bottle-This is very handy to see what you just picked or dug up. It is also good for a quick cool down, clean your hands, etc.
Hat & Gloves-The hat can provide shade for your face and block the sun from your eyes as you search for rocks. A good pair of leather gloves will prevent small cuts and abrasions, cushion the blow of a hammer or chisel, and help eliminate blisters and splinters.
Fun Facts to Know and Tell:
Never lay your hammer (or anything else) down and walk away from it with the thought you will find it again. Painting part of it with a loud neon color will let people know it is yours when they come across it. 
Don't pile "your" rocks and walk away. On the rare chance you locate the spot again, your rocks may not be there. No one is going to take them on purpose, but things look different in nature to others. Someone will think they just "lucked" onto a great find. When your bucket or bag is full, go and empty it and then return to collecting.
A whistle can be a life saver. It can summon others or help locate a stray.
Always be at least 10 minutes early to departure time at Field Trips. If the stated time is 7, be there at 6:45. This is the time to sign in and any last minute changes or info is given at this time. Always know who the Trip Leader is.